Navigation – Plan du site
Rubriques électroniques
Practical information

Publication Guidelines

04 juin 2008

Texte intégral

1Publication Guidelines:

  • for the quarterly journal Cultures & Conflits,

  • for the multilingual series Cultures & Conflits

  • and/or on the website of the journal: www.conflits.org

Journal : Cultures & Conflits

Proposal and submission of articles

2Your submission must be compiled as follows:

3- Your article in digital format sent by e-mail to the editorial staff of the journal: Estelle Durand (redaction@conflits.org)

4You should include:

5i) a named version: name, address, brief biography, references, publications etc.

6ii) an anonymous version which must not include, nor mention explicitly, your identity, nor any allusion to it (in the text, in the footnotes, or in the bibliographic references)

7- Your articles must be in: Times New Roman, size 12, with a line spacing of 1.5

8- A paper copy of both versions should be sent to the following address:

9Centre d’Etudes sur les Conflits

10Rédaction

1134, rue de Montholon

12BP n°20064

1375421 Paris Cedex 09

14France

15Each article submitted to the journal (whether unsolicited, or as part of a thematic issue) is reviewed externally and anonymously. The referees do not know the name of the author, just as the author does not know the name of the reviewer. This peer-review process allows each article to be thoroughly appraised by specialists in the issues involved.

16We remind you that your text and its contents are your sole responsibility.

17The following elements must be included with your article:

  • A summary of up to 10 lines in French and in English *

  • Five key words in French and in English: *

18i) Location (eg. Senegal, Europe, London, the Basque country)

19ii) Theme (eg. anti-terrorism, reconciliation, violence)

20iii) Organisation (eg. UN, Total, Transparency International, MSF, Europol, Police, UNESCO)

21iv) Discipline (eg. Political theory, sociology, epistemology, polemology)

22v) Period (eg. 2001, Twentieth Century, Coup d’Etat of 2006, Riots of 2005)

  • A short bibliography (10 references)

  • A short biography in French and in English (3 to 4 lines): institutions, titles, current place of work, publications*

23If you wish us to translate these elements for you please inform us as soon as possible.

The readership of Cultures & Conflits

24Cultures & Conflits is intended for an audience of academics and practitioners who are seeking high-quality information, which often requires ‘technical’ or ‘specialised’ references, such as the names of regions, ethnic groups, and the use of the language of sociology, anthropology, and philosophy. Without descending into ‘jargon’, it is necessary to use all these references, but also to not forget that we are targeting a wide audience, who may not be familiar with such references, and who may be specialists in different fields. You should give a brief definition of your key concepts, or references necessary to the location of places mentioned, in the text or in the footnotes.

Types of contribution

General

25Cultures & Conflits is a thematic quarterly journal. Each issue is placed under the direction of the editorial staff, the Cultures & Conflits editorial board, and the director(s) of the issue, who take scientific responsibility.

26Contributions fall into the following categories:

27 i) Articles based upon scientific research which fit the theme of the issue

28 ii) ‘Testimonial’ articles, published online, forming part of a thematic issue

29iii) Interviews, published online and/or in the printed version, forming part of a thematic issue

30iv) Articles based upon scientific research on themes other than those treated in depth in the issue, or on a topic of particular current interest

31v) Publications under the heading ‘Looking in-between’, to be sent to antoniagarciacastro@gmail.com

32vi) Publications under the heading ‘Chronicles’ (Bibliographic Chronicles, Seminar Chronicles, Cinematographic Chronicles, News Chronicles), to be sent to emmanuel-pierre.guittet@conflits.org

33vii) Publications under the heading ‘Resonances’. These may form part of a thematic issue of Cultures & Conflits, or continue questioning and reflecting upon issues raised in a previous issue. They may be published in the printed version, or online under the heading of unpublished ‘Resonances’ articles. To send proposals for articles for ‘Resonances’ please specify the issue, or the articles within it, to which you would like to react. These articles are to be sent to redaction@conflits.org.

34viii) Articles based upon scientific research published online under the heading ‘Unpublished Article

The heading ‘Looking in between

35These contributions should be sent to Antonia Garcia Castro: antoniagarciacastro@gmail.com Once the proposal has been accepted, the presentation of the articles should confirm to that followed in the printed version of Cultures & Conflits. On the other hand, if the article is published on the website as an ‘unpublished article’ the format - length etc. - will be decided in discussion with Antonia Garcia Castro.

Rules of publication for ‘Chronicles’

36 i) Submissions must be originals

37 ii) The submission should be between 4,000 and 8,000 characters, including footnotes

38 iii) Each submission should be accompanied with a short biography of 3 to 4 lines

39iv) After an initial reading by the person in charge of ‘Chronicles’, the submission will be anonymised and read by two people from the reading committee

40v) Following this, you will be informed whether the submission is unacceptable, acceptable subject to revisions, or accepted in its current state

41vi) From the date the person in change of ‘Chronicles’ receives your submission there will be a delay of three weeks while the committee considers its response, which will be sent to you by the editorial board of the journal.

Rules for the publication of articles

42Cultures & Conflits only publishes original and unpublished texts which, if they are accepted, may not be reprinted without the express authorization of the journal, which holds - with its co-publisher l’Harmattan - the copyright of the published articles. Authors retain full responsibility for the content of their articles.

43Each article (whether unsolicited, or part of an issue already planned in the editorial calendar) is submitted to the peer review process. This evaluation, external and anonymous (see the paragraph on the ‘Proposal and Submission of Articles’) determines if the article is acceptable as it is, or whether it is to be returned to the author for either minor or significant changes to be incorporated into a revised version. This version must take into account the recommendations and suggested modifications made by the referees, and sent in a shortened form to the authors. The notes, references, citations, and bibliography must confirm to the standards for the presentation of articles (no ‘harvard style’ for example; that is to say, no references in brackets to authors, including only the date, with the intention that a bibliography will be referred to. This is because we do not publish bibliographies with articles). If this is not the case, the text will be returned to the author to be brought into line with the editorial rules.

44Each article is reviewed twice, in parallel: three scenarios may arise:

45i) If the article receives two positive evaluations, the text is accepted, and a synthesis of the comments is sent to the author so that they can take into account the suggestions of the evaluators, which are aimed only at improving the paper.

46ii) If the article receives two negative evaluations, or if it does not correspond with the editorial policies of the journal, it will be rejected. This does not mean that other articles may not be submitted in future. Extracts from the reviewers may be sent to the author if they wish to improve their text before re-submitting it to other journals.

47iii) If the article receives one positive and one negative evaluation, the journal will ask for a third review. This will determine whether the article will be included in the journal.

48The editorial staff reserves the right to correct the language, spelling, syntax, punctuation, titles and sub-titles, and bibliographic rules. The editorial staff reserves the right to choose the presentation (illustrations, colour), the title of the issue, and the date of publication, in collaboration with the members of the editorial team and the editorial committee. The finalised version is sent for checking by the authors in the final stage of publication, before printing. Once they have given their agreement, or once the deadline for response has passed, it will no longer be possible for the authors to retract their article or carry out further corrections or changes to it, or to the broader structure of the issue.

Format of submitted articles

49Please avoid any particular formatting in word, as it only complicates the typesetting. For example, do not centre, embolden, or underline text, or change the format of the page, the tabs, …. The editorial staff of Cultures & Conflits is in charge of the standardisation of the text (using Quark Xpress) in line with the conventions followed in the journal.

50Sizing: Texts submitted for the thematic parts of the issue must not exceed 50,000 characters, including spaces and notes. Ideally, articles for the central theme of the journal will be between 30,000 and 40,000 characters, and around twenty pages in word (1980 characters per page, 55 characters per line on 36 lines).

51The article may be a lot shorter if they are to be published in other sections of the journal or on the website, or if they are interviews: between 2,000 and 4,000 characters for example.

52Summaries: Ensure that you attach a summary of your text (a maximum of 10 lines in Word, with margins of the default width, and around 1,050 characters, including spaces) in French and in English. These summaries will be published in the printed journal and on its website. If you wish us to translate these elements for you please inform us as soon as possible.

53Key words: To allow the referencing of your article on the internet, please provide four or five key words in French and in English corresponding to:

54i) Location (eg. Senegal, Europe, London, the Basque country)

55ii) Theme (eg. anti-terrorism, reconciliation, violence)

56iii) Organisation (eg. UN, Total, Transparency International, MSF, Europol, Police, UNESCO)

57iv) Discipline (eg. Political theory, sociology, epistemology, polemology)

58v) Period (eg. 2001, Twentieth Century, Coup d’Etat of 2006, Riots of 2005)

59Please notify us as soon as possible if you would like us to translate the key words for you.

60Titles and sub-titles: Avoid the use of too many sub-titles. We recommend, to clarify the hierarchy of the titles employed, the use of letters or numbers. They will disappear when the editorial staff are doing the page layout.

61Avoid mention of an ‘Introduction’ or a ‘Conclusion’. These will be removed by the editorial staff in the editing process.

62Notes and boxes: Try to keep the number, and especially the length, of notes to a minimum. A long note often remains unread, or complicates a concept instead of clarifying it. It is possible, in exceptional circumstances, to provide boxes for clarifications, methodological notes, statistical references, appendix, or important bibliographical references. Indicate the exact spot where you want the box inserted. If this is not indicated the editorial staff will place it at the end of the text.

63Reference/ webliography: For some time, ‘webliographies’ have been being increasingly used in scientific publications and university research. Like bibliographies, webliographies are subject to strict rules on citation: the exact URL and/or the ‘path’ through the various sections of the site to the page mentioned, supplementary references (paragraph numbers for articles on www.conflits.org), and date when the site was last visited. It should be remembered that internet addresses listed in footnotes linking to documents are difficult for readers to use. We instead advise that you indicate in the footnote the address of the website, and the ‘path’ to the document cited. Also, ensure that the documents you have used remain accessible online. If you are unsure, it is best to put these documents in an appendix on the online version of the journal. In all cases, it is crucial to include in the webliography the date of your last visit to the site, and the verification of its address.

64To avoid the unnecessary multiplication of website citations in a single article or document, we advise webmasters to create a link to www.conflits.org if they wish to quote from our articles.

65Quotations: Quotations in foreign languages should be translated into French in the text. They should be put in italics, and accompanied by the name of the translator, if known. If possible, the original version should also be included as a footnote.

66Example : “Life is offered here as a ‘symbolic’ protest [1] ”

67• 1   La vie s’offre ici comme protestation symbolique.

68For details of the typographical rules followed by the journal, see the ‘typographical rules’.

69Bibliographical references and footnotes: The footnote marker in the body of the text should be put in before the punctuation, and separated from the term or phrase to which it refers by a space.

70Avoid using the anthropological or ‘harvard style’, which only mentions the name of the author and the year, with the intention that the reader looks at the bibliography for the full reference.

71It is crucial to have a footnote for each reference. In word, use the ‘insert reference’ tool, and follow the following precise norms:

72Book: Surname, initials, title of the book (in italics), place of publication, publisher, the exact pages cited

73Exemple: Silverstein K., Private warriors, London, Verso, 2000, p. 172

74For the footnotes, use the Cultures & Conflits style.

75Edited books: Surname, initials, title of the article in quotation makes, pages numbers of the article, ‘in’ in non-italic script, name of the editor of the book followed by ‘(ed.)’, title of the book in italics, place of publication, publisher, the exact pages cited

76Example : Waever O., “Securitisation and Desecuritisation”, in Lipschutz R. (ed.), On Security, New York, Columbia University Press, 1995, pp. 47-86.

77Journal articles: Surname, initials, title of the article in quotation marks, title of the journal (in italics), volume/number of the journal, month and year of the issue, the exact pages cited

78Example : Coker C., “Outsourcing war”, Cambridge Review of International Studies, vol. 12, n°1, Autumn-Winter 1999, pp. 109 (translation by the author).

79Attach a select bibliography on the themes contained in your article (not more than 10 references).

80Acronyms: Do not forget to explain the acronyms used, even if they appear obvious to you. If there are a large number of acronyms in the issue, or in your article, create a table to give definitions.

81Tables, charts, diagrams, pictures for the printed version: For each image it is crucial to provide a digital file of good quality (high definition, 150 dpi minimum, ideally 300dpi), or a hard copy of sufficiently high quality to be scanned, and then put into the magazine format.

82If you wish to include tables of data in your article, it is important to pay attention to the layout of the journal, and therefore its format, which is not expandable: avoid oversized tables.

83Format : 125 mm x 200 mm (titles and legends included)

84A table which cannot be accommodated within these dimensions will require the journal’s layout to be altered, and in consequence risk delaying publication.

85Diagrams should be explicit and clear. They may be revised when the document is being formatted, and must be of the dimensions 125 mm x 200 mm (titles and legends included). All the documents will be printed in black and white, so attention must be paid to their legibility, and gradations of gray must not be present.

86Maps: These will be printed in black and white, so bear in mind their legibility. If the map provided is not legible the team will re-work it so that it is legible in black and white, and they may also change its dimensions. In any case, the format for the publication of maps is 125 mm x 200 mm max(titles and legends included).

87Maps and links to official documents online: Once the issue is online, we can use the possibilities offered by the Internet to link to official documents that are mentioned, or maps etc., through the ‘Links’ section attached with each article. If official texts are important for the content of your article, or the issue that you are directing, please send a webliography to our webmaster.

88Biography: Attach a short biography (3 to 4 lines) with your institutional affiliation, the themes of your research, projects you are currently involved in, and your last/main publications. These will figure in the title of your article in the printed version, and ultimately on out website. It is therefore unnecessary for you to include this information in the article, either in the text or in a note. Do not forget to give us your address, a telephone number through which we can contact you, and an e-mail address.

Proposals for an issue, and the role of the director of the issue

Proposals for an issue

89• Provide the editorial staff with a detailed document  (a minimum of 4 pages) setting out the ‘problematique’, taking into account the justification for and the relevance of the questions raised, the nature of the research already conducted, and the theoretical stakes etc.

90• Also provide a summary with the main themes of the articles, the authors approached, the ‘problematique’ of the articles, how the articles fit into the theme of the issue, and possibly the provisional titles.

91Cultures & Conflits is a journal of scientific and academic research, and so all the references provided in the articles must be complete and identifiable. There must be no ‘Harvard Style’ citations in the articles.

The role of the director of the issue

92The director of the issue must keep in mind the protocols for the publication of articles, their proposal and their submission, and their presentation.

93The journal must not exceed 192 pages in length (according to an agreement with our co-published l’Harmattan). It is therefore necessary to be consistent in the number of articles included (editorial and/or introduction included in this number) so as to not exceed this limit, and to bear in mind that around a quarter of this number (perhaps less, depending upon the number of sections) is reserved for particular sections of the journal, such as ‘Looking In-between’, ‘Chronicles’, ‘Resonances’, ‘Summaries’ etc.

94The editor of the issue can in no way challenge decisions made by the Editorial Committee, which completely relies upon the comments made by external evaluators. When an article is revised by its author in line with the recommendations of the evaluators, the modified version of the article may not be accepted by the Committee of the Editorial Staff if it has not sufficiently taken into account comments made concerning its content.

95The role of the editor of the issue is above all one of proposal, coordination, checking the coherence of the issue, and of promoting the issue once all this has been done.

96Each editor of an issue will present their network of authors to the editorial staff. The Committee reserves the right to add an article by another author, if its text has been approved, and if the number of pages allows it.

97The totality of the articles must fit the ‘problematique’ proposed, and set out in the editorial/introduction.

98The director of the issue may make proposals for the different sections of the journal (see the types of contribution: bibliographic or cinematographic chronicles, ‘Looking In-between’, ‘Resonances’, etc.).

Distribution

99The director of the issue must play a role in the distribution of the journal, in conjunction with the work done by l’Harmattan and the journal’s staff.

100It is, for example, expected that the director will promote the release of the issue at academic meetings and/or associations. Each issue will be accompanied by one or several public presentations in the most appropriate context (colloquium, seminar, study day, press conference, sales, etc.), as chosen by the person in charge of the journal’s distribution in conjunction with the director of the issue.

101The director must work alongside the team for the distribution of the issue by creating a ‘distribution plan’, consisting of contacts, researchers, media, reviews, radio shows, etc.). The director must come up with proposals for the sections that will form part of the online version of the issue, which contextualise and enrich the research presented in the issue, through sections such as ‘See also’, ‘Other resources’, ‘Links’, ‘Connected Articles’ etc.

102The communication staff will keep the director up-to-date on of the distribution of the issue, and expect him/her to be available for the possible solicitation of people contacted.

103The director may try to increase awareness of the journal through their line of work, such as university libraries, research centres, associations, media etc.

104Authors may also wish to contribute to the distribution and promotion of the journal.

Submission of unsolicited articles

105All unsolicited contributions are welcome. Each spontaneous submission of an article to the journal is subject to the same rules as submissions that are intended for a particular issue (see ‘Proposal and Submission of Articles’).

106The process of peer review is also the same. A minimum delay of a month is to be expected between the submission of the article to the editorial board, and receipt of the results of the evaluation. If the text is accepted and evaluated favourably, a synthesis of the comments made will be sent to the author for the revision and improvement of their article. The editorial board will then suggest to the author the possible options for publication:

107i) If the article fits in with one of the themes of an issue already planned in the editorial calendar, and there is enough space to insert it, then it will be published in one of these thematic issues

108ii) If the article fits in with one of the themes of an issue already planned in the editorial calendar, but the issue is already full, the journal will suggest to the author that the article be published online, as an ‘unpublished article’ attached to the online full-text articles of the printed version.

109iii) If the article is accepted, but it does not fit with any of the themes of already-planned issues, the journal will suggest to the author that it be published within the non-thematic part of the journal, or as an unpublished article on the website.

Submission of articles in foreign languages

110Articles submitted in foreign languages (either unsolicited, or as part of an issue) will first be evaluated in their original language. If the results of the review are positive, the author should revise their text in the original language, before translating it, or having it translated. In all cases, the author, to be published, should commit to providing a text that has been revised and is in French. They may contact the journal’s staff members if they wish to use the translators who work regularly with the journal.

Internet Site

Online Publication of Articles

111The journal Cultures & Conflits is accessible online on www.conflits.org, in addition to its printed format. We have chosen to make our archives open for research, through providing free access to all our issues since 1990. Each author will therefore see their articles made available on the home page of our website following the publication of the printed journal, normally after a delay of a few weeks. Following the publication of the subsequent issue of the journal the article will be placed in the archives, referenced through a double-index: authors, and key-words.

112For some time, ‘webliographies’ have been increasingly used in scientific publications and university research. Like bibliographies, webliographies are subject to strict rules on citation: the exact URL and/or the ‘path’ through the various sections of the site to the page mentioned, supplementary references (paragraph numbers for articles on www.conflits.org), and the date of the last visit to the site.

113It should be remembered that Internet addresses listed in footnotes linking to documents are difficult for readers to use. We instead advise that you indicate in the footnote the address of the website, and the ‘path’ to the document cited. Also, ensure that the documents you have used remain accessible online. If you are unsure, it is best to put these documents in an annex on the online version of the journal. In all cases, it is crucial to include in the webliography the date of your last visit to the site, and the verification of the address. To avoid the unnecessary multiplication of website citations in a single article or document, we advise webmasters to create a link to www.conflits.org if they wish to quote from our articles.

Copyright

114The rights of the author are ceded to the journal, which publishes the text in its totality, and provides free access on its website (www.conflits.org) under the terms of its Creative Commons licence.

115The articles may not be published in their totality on another website. A particular passage, or the start of an article, may be published on another site, with a link to www.conflits.org provided on the same page.

116It may be suggested that your article is published only on the website, under the title of ‘unpublished articles’ on the front page of the website.

Online publication of unpublished articles or complementary material

117It is possible for unpublished articles or testimony to be published only online. These articles are given prominence on the front page of our website.

118The site allows the uploading of material complementary to the printed issue, such as; photos, links to official documents, reproductions of official or unofficial documents, links to other articles on the same theme that are freely available, maps, etc.).

“Making a point on…”, authors and librarians

119The website takes part in the distribution of the content of the journal. This makes it possible to return to the subject of an issue to which you have contributed or reacted, and to add further articles and resources to a dossier published on the site.

120Even if you have not previously contributed to the journal, you can also propose a dossier to help us benefit from a work of synthesis or bibliography that you have undertaken.

121These dossiers are given prominence on the front page of our website.

Proposals for contributions to the Cultures & Conflits Series

122This book series is guided by Didier Bigo and Anastassia Tsoukala. Its value lies in the fact that it allows the publication of contributions either in English, Spanish, Italian, Greek, or German etc. These works can be collective or individual.

123The readership is the same as that of the journal, and the rules for contribution are the same (peer review, editorial and typographic rules).

124Contributions should be sent to anastasia.tsoukala@conflits.org, didier.bigo@libertysecurity.org, and redaction@conflits.org.

Typographic Rules

125The editorial staff wish to communicate certain typographic conventions in use. It would be appreciated if you followed these rules when writing your articles, and when correcting them. For the sake of uniformity, these rules entered into force following issue n°61 de Cultures & Conflits, (n°1/2006).

126Footnote markers

127• The footnote marker should be placed after the word or phrase to which it relates, separated by a space

128• The footnote marker always comes before the punctuation mark

129• At the end of quotation, it comes before the quotation mark

130Capitals

131It is recommended that capitals are used sparingly. For the names of official bodies, notably:

132Multiple government agencies must not be confused. Do not use capital letters for the first name, but only for the specific term which plays the role of a proper name.

133Examples: general council, the parliament of Bordeaux, the secretary of State for War and unique bodies (national or international), who competences extends to any territory or an international or supranational zone. The names of these bodies are real names: the first word necessary to their identification should be capitalised, as well as the adjective that precedes it.

134Examples: the Council of State, the High Court of Justice, the Conflict Tribunal, the European Commission, the United Nations, and the Organisation for African Unity (OAU)

135Quotations

136Sources : Cultures & Conflits is a journal of scientific research. All quotations, and all allusions to other works, must be linked to a precise, complete, and identifiable reference.

137Foreign languages: Quotations in foreign languages should be translated into French in the text. They should be put in italics, and accompanied by the name of the translator, if known.

138Ellipses inside quotations: If one - or several - words are not reproduced inside a quotation, they should be replaced with dots inside square brackets [...]. These will remain in standard characters, even if the rest of the quotation is in italics.

139Comments inside quotations: When the author inserts a comment inside a quotation it should be inside square brackets and in standard characters (eg. not italics).

140Quotation Marks

1411st type: French quotation marks « … »

1422nd type: Double quotation marks “…”

1433rd type : Single quotation marks ‘….’

144Numbers

145Numbers in general: Within the text of an article, be consistent in respect of representing numbers in words or figures. If your article contains a lot of numerical data, for the sake of readability you may wish to use only figures. On the other hand, if your article only contains a few figures, you may wish to use only words.

146Years: Years should always be written in Arabic numerals. Avoid abbreviations such as: the war of 1939-45 (except in specific cases: May 68 etc.)

147Centuries: The number of centuries should be composed in Roman numerals in small capital letters.

148Example : XIX  Century

149Ordinal numbers : abbreviations of ordinal numbers must be formatted consistent with the following list: 1er, 1re, 2e, 3e, etc. (and not 1ère, 2ème, 3ème, or 1ère, 2ème, 3ème.). Remember that 1o, 2o, 3o are abbreviations of ‘primo’, ‘secondo’, and ‘tertio’.

150Footnotes

151Bibliographical notes: Put in a footnote for each reference, and respect the following norms:

152Book: Surname, initials, title of the book (in italics), place of publication, publisher, the exact pages cited

153Exemple: Silverstein K., Private warriors, London, Verso, 2000, p. 172.

154For the footnotes, use the Cultures & Conflits style

155Edited books: Surname, initials, title of the article in quotation makes, pages numbers of the article, ‘in’ in non-italic script, name of the editor of the book followed by ‘(ed.)’, title of the book in italics, place of publication, publisher, the exact pages cited

156Example : Waever O., “Securitisation and Desecuritisation”, in Lipschutz R. (ed.), On Security, New York, Columbia University Press, 1995, pp. 47-86.

157Journal articles: Surname, initials, title of the article in quotation marks, title of the journal (in italics), volume/number of the journal, month and year of the issue, the exact pages cited

158Notes

159[1]  

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

« Publication Guidelines », Cultures & Conflits [En ligne], English documents, mis en ligne le 04 juin 2008, consulté le 23 août 2017. URL : http://conflits.revues.org/9022

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License

Ce texte est placé sous copyright de Cultures & Conflits  et sous licence Creative Commons.

Merci d’éviter de reproduire cet article dans son intégralité sur d’autres sites Internet et de privilégier une redirection de vos lecteurs vers notre site et ce, afin de garantir la fiabilité des éléments de webliographie. » (voir le  protocole de publication, partie « site Internet » : http://www.conflits.org/index2270.html).

Haut de page